Tag Archive | young adult

Review: The Immortal Rules

The Immortal Rules
The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

“We are vampires. It makes no difference who we are, where we came from. Princes, Masters and rabids alike, we are monsters, cut off from humanity. They will never trust us. They will never accept us. We hide in their midst and walk among them, but we are forever separate. Damned. Alone. You don’t understand now, but you will. There will come a time when the road before you splits, and you must decide your path. Will you choose to become a demon with a human face, or will you fight your demon until the end of time, knowing you will forever struggle alone?”

This is a journey of a young girl to find her humanity while being an undead…

The world as we know it has ended when Red Lung attacks. Flulike symptoms evolve to raging fever, necrosis of the lungs, and finally asphyxiation as the victims choke and drown in their own blood. A worldwide emergency is called, towns are emptied, cities lay in ruins, and the airborne virus continues its deadly march toward human extinction. To make it worse, the few remaining humans face another catastrophe when researches conducted to find the cure have gone wrong. The mutated virus doesn’t only kill its victim; it turns the victims into Rabids: mindless bloodthirsty corpses with fangs. Concerned with the depletion of the human population as their sources of food, vampires devise a way to keep the few remaining humans close and create a never-ending food supply in exchange for protection from Rabids. This is the world where vampires reign…

“In this world, you were either strong, or you were dead. You did what you had to if you wanted to survive.”

Allison Sekemoto does everything she can to survive in this mess-up world, but living as a blood cattle in a vampire city is not her way. Instead, she chooses to live a dangerous and risky life in the fringes with her small group of four, scavenging food during the day and hiding from vampires and Rabids during the night. Her hatred towards the vampires gives her the strength to endure and survive such life, until one night her groups are attacked by Rabids and she realizes her frail mortality. She is only given two choices: to die as a human or to live as the demon she despises the most.

“You are a monster. You will always be a monster, there is no turning back from it. But what type of monster you become is entirely up to you.”

Allie has to learn the rules about vampires and immortality. She must accept the fact that even though she is alive, she is practically dead. She must learn how to move and fight with her new body and strength. She must change her perceptions about humans and accept humans’ perceptions about her now. But, the most important thing is she must face her greatest fear: to feed on human’s blood. The humanity left inside Allie is in jeopardy. And she realizes that if she doesn’t want to lose to the hunger inside her and become a monster completely, she must strive and struggle hard…

“I’m not like you. I’m not like the vampires in the city. I might be a monster, but I can be human, too. I can choose to be human.”

Forced to flee from the vampire city, she meets a group of pilgrims seeking for Eden, a legendary safe haven rumored to be run by humans only. Unaware of her nature, the groups let her join them on the long and dangerous road. Once again, her humanity is tested when her nature is revealed and she is expelled from the group. Once again, Allie must decide what and who is worth dying for when the group is captured by a group of raiders led by a vampire. And for the very first time, she learns that she shouldn’t have fallen in love with a human…

What I do love from this book
• Honestly, I never thought I would read this series ever. First, the covers are unpromising. Well, BIG NOs. Second, the vampire is the heroine. Well, I love stories about vampires, but I prefer the male vampires as the main character rather than a female one. The idea of a strong female vampire ends up with a weak human boy is totally unappealing to me (yeah, somehow I prefer the male character to be more dominant than the female character). But I love Julie Kagawa’s books, especially the Iron Fey series, and it portraits a less dominant heroine who in the end turns to be more dominant than her lover, and I’m still madly in love with the story. So I thought, why not give Blood of Eden a chance? After reading the series, I HAVE NO REGRET. If I should have any, it will be: WHY DIDN’T I READ THE BOOKS SOONER?
• This is a series about vampire, but it is more than that. It is more about self-exploration and self-development, packaged into a dark twisted story that runs so smoothly from beginning to the end, with some romance and action that do not take over the main focus of the story. Are you tired of cheesy, feeble, and worthless plot for shallow entertainment offered by many young adult books? Are you tired of reading inner dialogue of stupid and inconsistent heroine who always in need of saving? Are you tired of bad boy as the main hero of a story? And are you tired of finding that bad boy unbelievably and impossibly end up together with the stupid heroine? If you are, I recommend you to read this series, because it offers you none of those. Believe me.
• The first most intriguing about this series is: the setting of time. I have read so many books about vampires and they always take place in the past time or present time. Ancient setting or modern setting. Blood of Eden is beyond my expectation and imagination. A dystopian and post-apocalyptic setting? Well, this is totally new for me, but no less magnificent than the usual ones, if not more.
• The second most intriguing fact: THE REAL VAMPIRE IS BACK!! Julie Kagawa portrays the vampires as they should be: a true monster and predator inflicting fear on humans, not some friendly and hospitable immortals coexisting with humans portrayed in some young adult stories, which sadly, make them look less vampiric. The vampires are dangerous bloodsucker with great strength and speed and fast healing who can’t walk under then sun without being burnt to ashes, afraid of fire and stakes, and must drink human blood to survive. If they ignore the last fact, the hunger and bloodlust will consume them and turn them into a monster. Even Kanin implies that one day, intentionally or not, Allie will kill a human, no matter how hard she tries not to. Yayy. Real vampire should be like that!
• Allie is a hard-ass character and I like her so much. Life is being so cruel to her yet she doesn’t give up, doesn’t cry or something like a damsel in distress. No. She’s not a kind of girl who waits for her prince charming to save the day. No. She’s not the kind of girl constantly in need of saving. No. She’s strong, capable, brave, and independent. She’s the one coming to save the others instead. She’s loyal and consistent. Even in the world when you must be self-oriented to survive, she does still prioritize others over herself, even when it costs her life. Even if she can choose an easy way by giving in to the hunger and becoming a monster, she still struggles and sticks to her principle to not be a monster. Her life is full of hardship but she always faces it strongly. As far as I know, Allison Sekemoto is a perfect heroine I ever meet in young adult fictions.
• At first, I don’t put too much hope and expectation for Allie’s love interest, Ezekiel Crosse, or Zeke. What is a mere human compared to vampire who is far superior after all? But Zeke changes my mind completely since the very first time he meets Allie. Even though it’s always Allie who comes to his rescue, I never get the impression that Zeke is powerless, dependent, or weak. Far from that. He might not have Allie’s physical superiority but he has great faith, humanity, and generosity, things that Allie lacks of. They complete each other. In the end, I can’t help but admit that Allie’s lover indeed should be a human because without Zeke, Allie might not be able to find her self-actualization and preserve her humanity.
• Kanin: Oh how I love this man. A Master vampire who turns out to be the mastermind of the experiment on vampires to find the cure for Red Lung leading to the spread of Rabidism to the world. Sire of Allison who is deeply tormented and feeling guilty, wandering to find redemption, to atone for his sins. Yet, his words, demeanors, attitudes, behaviors, everything, are the epitome of an ancient vampire. I love the way he offers Allie immortality. I love the way he teaches her the rules of vampire world. I love his strength. He takes bullets into his chest like they are nothing. But I’m so sad when he must be separated from Allie and hope to read more about him in the next books.
• Caleb. The young boy somehow intrigues me. He is the reason why Allie meets Zeke. He is the only human, besides Zeke, who accepts the fact that Allie is a vampire but still believes in her good nature. He spends his time with Allie shorter than Stick, but he doesn’t judge Allie a monster just because she is a vampire. For an innocent young boy who has been convinced by the adults around him that a vampire is a monster, he has a truly big heart.

What I don’t like from this book
• Stick. It can be said that he is the opposite character of Allie. A boy, weak, dependent, cry-baby, and everything that Allison is not. Allie tries her best to protect and care for him, even when it costs her life. For what? For nothing. Not only he accuses Allie to be a monster, despite everything that she has done for him, he also betrays her, leading to her separation from Kanin.
• Ruth. I never understand her hatred toward Allie, even long before she knows that Allie is a vampire. Is that her nature to be suspicious of and jealous of any girls of her age coming to the group and speaking with Zeke? Because, it seems that her being bitchy to Allison is for no reason other than Zeke. Normally, a nasty character like this is needed to show the good side of the main heroine. But, honestly, Allison is doing fine even without her. So, I should say that her appearance in the story is worthless. Well, don’t blame me to be very glad when she is dead a painful death, though I pity Caleb for losing her only sister.
• I know that this series is darker than most of young adult books, involving violence and gore, which means that the death of one or more characters shouldn’t be a big deal. However, I feel a bit disappointed that the small group of pilgrims becomes smaller, especially when it turns out that Eden does exist. The most upsetting deaths are those of Jeb and Darren, particularly Darren. How I hope that he and Ruth exchange positions.
• Why oh why oh why Zeke should kiss Allie in front of the others while they have been terrified-over-heels with her being a vampire? It’s not that I dislike it, but can’t he do it when they are alone? I mean, there are so many chances when he is alone with Allie. Why should the first kiss they share be witnessed by others?
• The ending. Yes. It actually lies in the gray area between happy ending and sad ending. On one hand, Allie and Zeke manage to save their group from Jackal’s hold and bring them to Eden. However, as a city without vampire, Eden also symbolizes the painful reality: that a vampire cannot be together with a human. So in the end, after they, especially Allie, overcome their hesitation about their love and their difference, they should be separated? It’s not fair.
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