Review: The Lightning Thief

The Lightning Thief
The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

You shall go west, and face the god who has turned.
You shall find what was stolen, and see it safely returned.
You shall be betrayed by one who calls you a friend.
And you shall fail to save what matters most, in the end.

Have you, by any chance, suffered from one of these symptoms?
• The inability to sit still, or stay still, for a long period of time
• The urge to do something, or anything at all, which involves physical motion
• The inability to read or spell or pronounce words
• Surprisingly awesome skill in Latin
• Severe hallucinations and delusions
• The tendency to be involved in a problem, sometimes serious problem

If you suffer from the first and second symptoms, you are an ADHD sufferer. If you suffer from the third symptoms, you are dyslexic. However, if you have all the symptoms above, you might want to take a deep breath before I tell you something that definitely will change your life forever. Oh, before that, I want to make sure some extra things. Do you, by any chance, come from a single-parent family? Or have difficulty with nasty stepmother or stepfather? Has either your mom or your dad passed away since you are so small to remember a face or a voice?

If you answer all my questions with a “yes”, then I must give you my congratulation and condolence. Congratulation! You are, one hundred percent, demigod. Yes. You are half mortal and half immortal. One of your parents is a Greek god. You are special kids with special powers. But here comes my condolence because your life will get more difficult ahead, harmed by dangerous quests, monsters drawn to your power, and, the enemies of your god parent. Only you can determine whether you will survive or not. Are you scared? Don’t worry. Even the greatest demigods should start from zero at first. Like Percy Jackson, the main hero in this story.

Rick Riordan has created the most unbelievable epic and great adventure ever based on my most favorite theme, Greek myth! He answers all my questions about the possibilities of the immortal existence of Greek gods. If Greek gods do exist and they are indeed immortal, I always wonder what will happen to them with the advance of technologies and times. I mean, they are originally from ancient Greece; will they always be like their original description forever? And since fidelity is not their nature, should there be more Hercules, Perseus, or Helen up to this day? Where are they? What will happen to them? Rick Riordan answers them all in a very addictive series of Percy Jackson and the Olympians. I love the story, the cliffhangers, and the humors (yeah, many times I caught myself giggling while reading them!).

The Lightning Thief is the first book of the series Percy Jackson and the Olympians

Percy Jackson, a 12 year old boy with ADHD and dyslexia, tends to get into troubles. He has been expelled from many schools. His teacher changes into a monster and tries to kill him, but it turns out that the teacher doesn’t exist, according to other students. A Minotaur tries to kill him, his mother, and his friend Grover, who turns out to be a satyr. He learns the truth about him being a demigod and comes to Camp Half-Blood, a place for demigods where he is supposed to be safe. But not really. His father claims him publicly and he is no other than Poseidon himself, one of the three eldest gods (along with Zeus and Hades) who have sworn an oath for more than 60 years ago that they will not have demigod children since they will possess too great power that can affect the course of human events. Percy’s existence is a violation of the oath. Moreover, Zeus’ lightning bolt has been stolen recently, leading to suspicions among the gods. Percy must prove his innocence and prevent the incoming war between the three gods by finding the lightning thief and returning the stolen weapon. Following the prophecy by Delphi, he sets into a dangerous quest with Grover the satyr and Annabeth Chase, the daughter of Athena.

What I do love from this book
• The adaptation of the Greek gods to today America. Expect to find the mighty Mount Olympus on the 600th floor of the Empire State Building. Expect to find that Apollo has flying bus rather than a sun chariot. Expect to find Ares battle with gatling gun or even rocket launcher. Expect to what to be expected.
• Camp Half-Blood and its cabins, where the demigods sleep with their siblings from their god parent.
• The amusing habit of Dionysus to call people by wrong names yet still with similar rhyme and his strange tendency to want to change Percy into a dolphin.
• Riptide. I always want a weapon that can reappear in my pocket. That way, I don’t need to be afraid of losing my weapon.
• Annabeth’s invisibility cap. There are so many things I want to do by being invisible, which definitely cannot be written here.
• There are waiting lists to get across the Styx? Chiron needs a pay raise? And Cerberus is a huge three-headed puppy longing to play ball! Even the Underworld has adapted to the civilization, though it is still gloomy.
• The sarcastic and hilarious titles of each chapter and the great sense of humor of Percy Jackson as the narrator.

What I don’t like from this book
• I still find the fact that Zeus manages to keep an oath to have no children for more than 70 years totally unbelievable. Well, he cannot keep the oath by having Thalia Grace, yet for more than 70 years he doesn’t have any demigod children beside Thalia. It is too amazing.
• Dionysus’s appearance. He is supposed to be quite handsome. In the first book of Greek myth I’ve read, his handsomeness is described almost best Apollo’s. So, I kind of disappointed to read that he has a chubby face, a red nose and bloodshot eyes in this series. Or maybe he chooses this appearance because of Zeus’s punishment for him to be the camp director of Camp Half-Blood for a century? Or maybe it is because he is forbidden to drink wine or to do anything related to grapes? If it is the case, I think I understand. I mean, it is similar to forbid Poseidon to control water or to punish Ares to arrange flowers instead of handling weapons. For a century, no less! Poor Mr. D.
• The idea that Ares, the god of war, almost loses to Percy, a demigod. Well, though Percy is his cousin, he is still half human and mortal. I guess, for a young demigod who just has learned about himself not long ago, he is too strong to be able to almost beat a god. Maybe it is because Ares is under the influence of Kronos?
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